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International Concourse E

2011 – 2012 Exhibit: “Recycle Runway: Reclaimed Fashions by Nancy Judd”

“Recycle Runway” is a collection of 18 couture fashions made from repurposed trash by artist and environmental educator Nancy Judd from Santa Fe, N.M. Judd’s goal is to inspire people in a fun and positive way to consider the possibility that “waste does not exist — only wasted resources.”

Judd’s trashique classic-style clothing is inspired by vintage designs and created from discarded and reclaimed materials. Each garment takes 50 to 400 hours to create and is made to last 100 years.

“The dichotomy of an elegant dress made from garbage is very intriguing,” Judd said. “I love the challenge of transforming trash into glamorous fashions.”

The creations have specific messages to convey. A faux-fur coat, made with loops of cassette tape, explores the planned obsolescence of new technology. A glamorous, floor-length evening gown, which glitters with thousands of crushed glass pieces, encourages us to see garbage in new ways. A flamenco-inspired dress is made of origami junk-mail fans sewn together like fish scales and addresses the tragedy of wasted resources.

Judd hopes to inspire people to become eco-leaders — people who find creative ways to care for the Earth at work, home, school or church and in their communities.

“We each make choices every day that can help to solve the environmental crisis,” she said. “Engage your creativity, use your power and become an eco-leader!”

Visit www.RecyleRunway.com/ATL to take the full eco-quiz, perform quick e-activism, find resources, watch a video about this exhibition and share photos with friends.

Recycle Runway

Recycle Runway

Recycle Runway

Recycle Runway

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International Concourse E also features three unique Rotating Exhibit spaces designed to enlighten, educate, and share a sense of place with travelers who are coming to or passing through Atlanta.

Buyer Beware!
A display from the US Department of Fish and Wildlife Services

The Airport Art Program has partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to feature an informational exhibit on Concourse E. These fascinating displays educate passengers about the dangers of bringing prohibited natural items into the United States. The goal is to reduce the market for souvenirs made of endangered species before those items enter the United States.

Except for a very few pieces of coral and tortoise-shell jewelry loaned by the Federal Repository in Denver, everything in the 13 exhibit cases was seized right here in the Atlanta Airport. Items on view range from a complete polar bear skin, to a stuffed hyena, to mounted butterflies in every color of the rainbow. You may also see a blowgun from South America with rare macaw feathers on it or a delicate comb, made from a giant sea turtle. The exhibit is a powerful reminder of the fragility and beauty of nature.

Click here to get tips for travelers from the Fish and Wildlife Service or visit http://www.fws.gov.

Fish and Wildlife Buyer Beware

Fish and Wildlife Buyer Beware

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The Center for Puppetry Arts Display Cases

The Center for Puppetry Arts, located in downtown Atlanta, is the largest non-profit organization in the United States dedicated to puppetry. The Center is a cultural treasure unique to our city, and six cases located on the Boarding Level of Concourse E display a range of puppets from its permanent collection. The works include a knight from Indonesia, a pig from Nigeria and two puppets created by F.H. Bross, an influential German puppeteer

For more information about the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta please visit http://www.puppet.org.

Puppet

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The High Museum of Art Display Cases

The Airport Art Program is proud to have an on-going partnership with the High Museum of Art located at the Woodruff Art Center in downtown Atlanta. Situated near the center point of Concourse E, three vitrines near the main escalators show some outstanding glass artwork from the High Museum’s permanent collection of decorative arts.

To learn more about the High Museum of Art go to http://www.high.org.

High Museum of Art Display

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