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: PASSENGER INFO III:

Strings attached: Exhibit spotlights variety,
history of puppetry
By Amy Schneider

“World on a String,” presented in conjunction with the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta, gives travelers through Hartsfield-Jackson the opportunity to explore the history, variety and pageantry of puppetry.

The 51 puppets hail from several countries in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa, including China, Cambodia, Mali, Egypt, Indonesia, Italy, Belgium and the United States. Their current home is in the walkway that connects the main security area and Concourse T.

“We are proud to present this colorful, eye-catching exhibit, which will appeal to all age groups,” said Katherine Dirga, Airport Art Program manager. “The puppets on display represent some iconic forms of the art, such as Punch and Judy, as well as interesting varieties that may be less familiar, such as water puppetry.”

Water puppetry — or mua roi nuoc — is a traditional art that dates back to the 12th century in Vietnam. Puppeteers, who all had to be men, were prohibited from marrying outside their community in order to safeguard their villages’ secret methods of building and manipulating the puppets. The performers stand in deep water behind screens and control the floating figures with long poles.

The exhibit also features marionettes, hand puppets, shadow puppets and string puppets, most of which are from the 20th century and all of which are on loan from the Center for Puppetry Arts. “World on a String” will be on display until fall 2012.

Punch, 1971, by Michael Beckner, United States

Punch, 1971, by Michael Beckner, United States

A mask of Scar (left) from “The Lion King” Broadway musical was designed by Julie Taymor. Performers in the show wore the animal masks above their faces, allowing them to convey expressions and emotions. The acclaimed show also used a variety of other puppetry techniques, including shadow puppets. 

A mask of Scar (left) from “The Lion King” Broadway musical was designed by Julie Taymor. Performers in the show wore the animal masks above their faces, allowing them to convey expressions and emotions. The acclaimed show also used a variety of other puppetry techniques, including shadow puppets.

Chickens, 1951, by Rene Zendejas, United States 

Chickens, 1951, by Rene Zendejas, United States


© 2011 Hartsfield-Jackson News. A Publication from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. All rights reserved.

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