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Carving a niche: Exhibit highlights wooden works
By Amy Schneider

For centuries, skilled carvers have created wooden bowls and other practical household items. In the hands of a wood-turner with an eye for art, however, a chunk of wood can step beyond mere dinnerware.

Hartsfield-Jackson’s new exhibit in two display cases — titled “Three Pioneers of Contemporary American Woodturning” and “Woodturning as an Art Form” — showcases more than 40 of these wooden artworks in the Atrium. The pieces include bowls of various sizes, vases, candleholders and decorative boxes.

“The pieces in this exhibit demonstrate how artists’ creativity transformed a useful, necessary trade into an outlet for aesthetic beauty,” said David Vogt, Airport Art Program manager. “The quality of the wood is only part of what makes each piece a work of art; the rest comes from the imagination and technical skill of the wood-turners.”

One of the display cases features pieces by three pioneers in contemporary wood turning: Atlanta architect Ed Moulthrop, who perfected methods of creating large-scale bowls from Southern tree species; Bob Stocksdale, who gained international recognition for the simplicity and beauty of his work; and Rude Osolnik, who was known for finding the beauty in the natural “flaws” of wood.

The second case contains a variety of pieces from artists all over the United States — including Georgia, Tennessee, Vermont, Utah, California, Oregon and Hawaii — as well as one from the United Kingdom. 

The exhibit will be on display through July.

Stephen Paulsen of California is renowned for making these scent bottles, which have glass vials inside to store perfumes.

Stephen Paulsen of California is renowned for making these scent bottles, which have glass vials inside to store perfumes.

The pieces in the exhibit come from all over the nation and even from the United Kingdom.

The pieces in the exhibit come from all over the nation and even from the United Kingdom.

Some of the pieces, such as this one by Michelle Holzapfel of Vermont, feature intricate detail.

Some of the pieces, such as this one by Michelle Holzapfel of Vermont, feature intricate detail.

One case contains representative pieces by three big names in the art of wood turning: Ed Moulthrop (the two large pieces to the left), Bob Stocksdale (the smaller items in the center) and Rude Osolnik (the unusually shaped pieces at right).

One case contains representative pieces by three big names in the art of wood turning: Ed Moulthrop (the two large pieces to the left), Bob Stocksdale (the smaller items in the center) and Rude Osolnik (the unusually shaped pieces at right).

This piece is an example of Rude Osolnik’s method of utilizing the natural imperfections of the wood.

This piece is an example of Rude Osolnik’s method of utilizing the natural imperfections of the wood.


© 2012 Hartsfield-Jackson News. A Publication from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. All rights reserved.

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